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Beulah Extra is available on CD - select Beulah Extra download tracks and have them supplied on compact disc. The limit is 75 minutes of music per disc. Each disc costs GBP11.45 post free (standard mail/airmail worldwide, signed for or registered mail will be charged extra). Allow 14 days for delivery.
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Extra Tracks

Below are tracks from our library that never made it onto one of our compact discs. They can be downloaded here as high quality 320kbs AAC encoded (MP3) files.

Purchasers of tracks have unlimited personal use but must not pass or sell on to third parties nor broadcast without prior permission from PPL

Charles Hubert Hastings Parry (1848-11918)

Parry was born in Bournemouth, the youngest of six children of Thomas Gambier Parry (1816–1888) of Highnam Court, Gloucestershire, a painter, art collector and inventor of the "spirit fresco" process. From this upper-middle class background, Parry was sent to Twyford Preparatory School in Hampshire and Eton, where his interest in music was encouraged and developed. While still at Eton Parry successfully sat the Oxford Bachelor of Music examination, the youngest person who had ever done so. His examination exercise, a cantata, O Lord, Thou hast cast us out, "astonished" the Oxford Professor of Music, Sir Frederick Ouseley, and was triumphantly performed and published in 1867. On going on to Oxford after leaving Eton, Parry did not study music, being intended by his father for a commercial career, and instead read law and modern history. From 1870 to 1877 he was an underwriter at Lloyd's of London.

Parry continued his musical studies alongside his work in insurance. He took lessons from William Sterndale Bennett, but finding them insufficiently demandinghe sought lessons from Johannes Brahms. Brahms was not available, and Parry was recommended to the pianist Edward Dannreuther, "wisest and most sympathetic of teachers".

Parry's first major works appeared in 1880: a piano concerto, which Dannreuther premiered, and a choral setting of scenes from Shelley's Prometheus Unbound. The first performance of the latter has often been held to mark the start of a "renaissance" in English classical music, but was regarded by many critics as too avant garde. Parry scored a greater contemporary success with the ode Blest Pair of Sirens (1887), commissioned by and dedicated to Charles Villiers Stanford, one of the first British musicians to recognise Parry's talent. Stanford described Parry as the greatest English composer since Purcell. Blest Pair of Sirens, a setting of Milton's At a Solemn Musick, suggested as a text by Grove, established Parry as the leading English choral composer of his day.

Contemporary critics generally regarded Parry's orchestral music as of secondary importance in his output, but in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries many of Parry's orchestral pieces have been revived. These include five symphonies, a set of Symphonic Variations in E minor, the Overture to an Unwritten Tragedy (1893) and the Elegy for Brahms (1897).

When Sir George Grove retired as director of the Royal College of Music, Parry succeeded him from January 1895, and held the post until his death. In 1900 he succeeded John Stainer as professor of music at Oxford. An obituarist in 1918 lamented these calls on Parry's time: "A composer who counts is rare enough anywhere, any time. Do not try to use him as a mixture of university don, cabinet minister, city magnate, useful hack, or a dozen things besides. A great blow was delivered against English music when Parry was appointed to succeed Sir George Grove as director of the RCM." Parry resigned his Oxford appointment on doctor's advice in 1908 and in the last decade of his life produced some of his best-known works, including the Symphonic Fantasia '1912' (also called Symphony No. 5), the Ode on the Nativity (1912), Jerusalem (1916) and the Songs of Farewell (1916–1918). The piece by which he is best known, the setting of William Blake's poem Jerusalem mentioned above, was immediately taken up by the suffragette movement, with which both Parry and his wife were strongly in sympathy.
i was glad
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jerusalem
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The review in the Gramophone for April 1926 writes :
Peter Dawson has given us what seems to be the first recording of Parrys setting of Blake's Jerusalem, which seems likely to become deservedly a national hymn. He sings it inspiringly.
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